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Raw Milk Victory

Rules Proposed in California Could Go Nationwide

July 3, 2008 at 6:19AM by Deirdre Dolan

A critical hurdle was just cleared in California where the threat of raw milk becoming illegal (as it already is in many states) was looming. The Assembly Health Committee voted unanimously for SB 201, the Fresh Raw Milk Act of 2008. They are also close to passing legislation that will codify making it safe and legal, hopefully to be used as a template in other states.

Today is the hearing before the Assembly Agriculture Committee, that is expected to vote in favor of the bill. After that the bill goes to the entire assembly.
California readers can check in here for more details on when to make critical phone calls in support.

I’m very happy with the milk club I joined -- a great side benefit is the access to nitrate-free pork bacon, organic beef and Celtic sea salt -- but it would be way more convenient to buy everything down the block than traveling to appointed locales at appointed times.

It took some my husband some convincing that raw milk really can be trusted. Here’s a story that helped my case about one of many meticulous dairymen.

In other milk news Grist reported on a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences about how artificial growth hormones increase the sustainability of the dairy industry by easing the impact giant dairies have on land, water and air. Unfortunately the logic is lacking.

Grist also reports on the new milk bottles that big box stores are using and that save on shipping costs. The new uniform jugs are spout-less and harder to pour from, but fit onto trucks, don’t require crates that need to be washed and picked up, and allow places like Sam’s Club to store 224 in the space that used to hold 80.

Some have complained that the new carton is an example of how carbon constraints benefit big box retailers, but it’s always refreshing to see large scale waste eliminated. I won’t be buying any of these new milk cartons, but the dairies where I buy my milk from may eventually follow their footsteps.