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Defending the rights and broadening the freedoms of family farms and protecting
consumer access to raw milk and nutrient dense foods.
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Maine’s Local Food Ordinances

Join Attorney Pete Kennedy and Maine farmer Deborah Evans on the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund's radio show this Saturday.  

UPDATE: Listen to the recording of this show.

1st Hour

2nd Hour

The Food Rights Hour
Republic Broadcasting Network (RBN)
Saturday, April 16, 2011 
8 pm - 10 pm Eastern; 7 - 9 Central; 6 -8 Mountain, 5 - 7 Pacific.

Listen Live http://republicbroadcasting.org/?page_id=11044

QUESTIONS? Be sure to call in during the Show: 800-313-9443

The Maine Food Sovereignty movement is gathering steam. Join this week’s host Pete Kennedy, attorney and President of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, with his guest, Deborah Evans, who operates Bagaduce Farm in Brooksville, Maine and is a primary advocate for the food sovereignty ordinance.

These are exciting times. A third Maine town has now adopted the food sovereignty ordinance. Read more here.

According to the Local Food and Community Self-Governance Ordinance of 2011, “The purpose of the Local Food and Community Self-Governance Ordinance is to:

  1. Provide citizens with unimpeded access to local food;
  2. Enhance the local economy by promoting the production and purchase of local agricultural products;
  3. Protect access to farmers’ markets, roadside stands, farm based sales, and direct producer to patron sales;
  4. Support the economic viability of local food producers and processors;
  5. Preserve community social events where local foods are served or sold;
  6. Preserve local knowledge and traditional foodways.”
Why not join us, and find out how you could do this in your community too?

Be sure to call in with your questions. CALL-IN NUMBER: 800-313-9443

The Heart of the Matter - by Deborah Evans

It is beyond my comprehension that we must go to this effort to reclaim a right that the Founding Fathers assumed to be as natural as our right to take a breath of air. Many of them were farmers themselves. But here we are and fight we must. 

I constantly remind myself that the farms of my childhood, chickens in the barnyard, my grandmother's sour cherry pie with lard crust, the sound of warm fresh milk from Mr. Carpenter's cows being poured through the filter in the milk room, kitchen garden strawberries, on-farm slaughter of pigs and beeves in the fall and the resulting bacons and sausages, have NEVER existed in most peoples' lives regardless of their age. 

To not KNOW, and I mean really KNOW any part of your food at this most intimate level is to know nothing. Our ordinance re-asserts and protects our indefeasible right to KNOW our food - the over-ripe peaches of our neighbor's trees in summer, the fresh milk homestead cheese of another neighbor's stone cellar cave, Flossie's mouthwatering baked soldier beans at the Grange suppers. This nutrient-dense food I KNOW I know.


Pete Kennedy is an attorney in Sarasota, Florida and serves as the president of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund and vice president of the Farm-to-Consumer Foundation. Prior to and since the founding of these organizations, Pete has worked on raw dairy issues in various States as well as other food distribution aspects including extensive reviews of legislation, particularly food safety and raw milk bills. He also provides instruction on the legal aspects for Cow-Share College & Goat-Share University.

 

Deborah Evans
They say "You can take the girl off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the girl." I'm a living testimonial to that.

I was raised on small farms in Ohio, the product of many generations of farmers. My husband and I own Bagaduce Farm and we sell all of our Certified Organic heritage-breed pork, chevon and lamb through word of mouth and at four near-by farmers markets. We are gradually expanding the list of Bagaduce Farm label value-added products such as our sea-salted lard caramels, locally known as Criminal Caramels as a result of my involvement in our Local Food and Community Self-Governance Ordinance work.