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Defending the rights and broadening the freedoms of family farms and protecting
consumer access to raw milk and nutrient dense foods.
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Lawmaking in the United States
To locate your representative, read bills, find out who’s involved and track the bill’s progress, check out GovTrack (link)

FEDERAL | STATE | PROPOSED REGS | LAWMAKING

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Summary of Raw Milk Statutes & Administrative Codes

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Federal Legislation & Hot Topics

Bills for 111th Congress 2009-2010

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PROPOSED REGULATIONS  

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Proposed Federal Regulations

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LAWMAKING

FEDERAL | STATE | PROPOSED REGS | LAWMAKING

Lawmaking in the United States
Click to download document:     [.doc]     [.pdf]

The Constitution of the United States and its amendments form the basis of our legal rights and privileges.  Only laws that fall within the framework of the Constitution and the legal precedents regarding the Constitution's intent can remain in effect.

The United States has three branches of government: legislative, executive, and judicial.  Laws may evolve from the action of each branch.  A legislative history generally traces a bill from its introduction in Congress through the legislative process.  Research on the history of a law may also include tracing administrative law (executive branch) and case law (judicial branch).
House and Senate publications are cited as:

PUBLICATION

HOUSE

SENATE

Bill

HR

S

Resolution

H Res

S Res

Joint Resolution

HJ Res

SJ Res

Concurrent Resolution

H Con Res

S Con Res

http://www.uic.edu/depts/lib/documents/resources/lawmaking.html
Click here to read full document

Source:  University of Illinois at Chicago website; documents revised by Aimee C. Quinn, 28 September 2004; accessed 16 September 2010 at
www.uic.edu/depts/lib/documents/resources/docguides/Lawmaking.doc
and
www.uic.edu/depts/lib/documents/resources/docguides/Lawmaking.pdf

111th Congress 2009-2010

Federal Sites
U.S. House of Representatives

U.S. Senate

Library of Congress 

Regulations.gov

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Contacting Legislators
To locate your legislators, read bills, find out who's involved and track the progress of any federal bill, tryGovTrack 

Many legislator website email links will only accept messages from the particular legislator’s constituents.  

Although email is convenient, most communication to legislators is actually handled by their staff. 

Be sure to follow up. The extra effort to compose a letter and send it by Postal Mail or by Fax followed by a Visit or Phone Call is likely to be most effective.

When calling or visiting, always be courteous. Ask to speak to the staffer handling your type of issue. Connecting with hearts and minds is key.