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News for September 24, 2010

Raw Dairy Advocates Promote Real Milk

As you drive along bucolic Green Hill Road in Telford, Pennsylvania, you could easily miss the unassuming sign on a mailbox notifying you of the location of Hendricks Farms & Dairy. When you pull into the parking lot, you may well be greeted by strutting roosters and waddling geese.

Hendricks Farms is a small, family-owned farm that produces raw milk dairy and beef from grass-fed animals who are certified as humanely raised and handled. The farm is powered by draft horses and also produces free-range poultry and eggs.

READ MORE (ezine) ]

Schmidt's Raw Milk Crusade into B-C

Michael Schmidt is taking his raw-milk battle to British Columbia.

Schmidt has taken over the operation of the Home On The Range cow-sharing syndicate in that province.

READ MORE (Agri-Media) ]

Chilean Economist Manfred Max-Neef: US Is Becoming an 'Underdeveloping Nation'

(Video)

READ MORE (Common Dreams) ]

Raw-milk fans are getting a raw deal

Queen Elizabeth drinks her milk raw. She reportedly thinks so highly of unpasteurized milk that, when her grandsons Princes William and Harry were students at Eton, she instructed herdsman Adrian Tomlinson to bottle up raw milk from her Windsor herd and deliver it to them at school.

Canadians, however, are not permitted to emulate their head of state. Raw milk cannot legally be sold in Canada, except into government-authorized “supply management” cartels, where it goes to be pasteurized. Only those who happen to own their own cow can legally consume raw milk.

READ MORE (Globe and Mail) ]

I was wrong about veganism. Let them eat meat – but farm it properly

This will not be an easy column to write. I am about to put down 1,200 words in support of a book that starts by attacking me and often returns to this sport. But it has persuaded me that I was wrong. More to the point, it has opened my eyes to some fascinating complexities in what seemed to be a black and white case.

In the Guardian in 2002 I discussed the sharp rise in the number of the world's livestock, and the connection between their consumption of grain and human malnutrition. After reviewing the figures, I concluded that veganism "is the only ethical response to what is arguably the world's most urgent social justice issue". I still believe that the diversion of ever wider tracts of arable land from feeding people to feeding livestock is iniquitous and grotesque. So does the book I'm about to discuss. I no longer believe that the only ethical response is to stop eating meat.

READ MORE (Guardian) ]

Monsanto hired mercenary Blackwater to infiltrate anti-GMO groups

Documents reveal that Blackwater has been busy expanding its corporate reach by providing intelligence services for agencies such as the Canadian Military, Netherlands Police and corporations like Monsanto.

Blackwater is a private, mercenary army. They've been called the 'shadow army,' and most notoriously worked for the United States in Iraq, where the company courted controversy. Journalist Jeremy Scahill, who wrote a book about Blackwater, wrote an exclusive for The Nation, revealing general details of the extent of the Blackwater business operations.

READ MORE (Digital Journal) ]

New Food Safety Bill Could Make Things Worse

That’s not just my view; that’s the view of writer Barry Estabrook, an ardent critic of the food industry (“Politics of the Plate“), writing at The Atlantic. You needn’t go along completely with Estabrook’s dim view of industrialized agriculture to realize he’s right in one of his central contentions: “the proposed rules would disproportionately impose costs upon” small producers, including traditional, low-tech and organic farmers and foodmakers selling to neighbors and local markets. Even those with flawless safety records or selling low-risk types of foodstuff could be capsized by new paperwork and regulatory burdens that larger operations will be able to absorb as a cost of doing business.

Things could reach a showdown any day now. The food safety bill had stalled in the Senate under criticism from small farmer advocates, as the New York Times acknowledged the other day in an absurdly slanted editorial that somehow got printed as a news article. Now Harry Reid is talking about forcing the bill through before the midterms. Significantly — as advocates of the bill trumpet — large foodmakers and agribusiness concerns have signed off on the bill as acceptable to them. Well, yes, they would, wouldn’t they?

READ MORE (Cato) ]

 

 

 

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